Do you believe in what you’re selling?

I will now get you to buy something you don’t want

There’s a great line in the movie Heat about selling stuff.

Charlene Shiherlis: What else are you selling?

Sgt. Drucker: All kinds of shit. But I don’t have to sell this and you know it, ’cause this kind of shit here sells itself.

It sells itself. It doesn’t need coercion, manipulation, nor rationalization. Drucker doesn’t have to say a word because he believes that what he is selling is already attractive to Charlene. He doesn’t need to do anything more than present the offer.

When you approach someone romantically, you are selling yourself.

You are the merchandise and the man or woman you are talking to is the buyer. What you are selling — – how you look, act, think and feel — should already be attractive to someone else without needing a sales pitch. It should sell itself.

 

What happens when you don’t believe in the product you are selling?

If you don’t think someone is going to be interested in buying your product, they probably won’t buy it. Ask yourself, would you buy food from a restaurant that says:

“Our food is only OK. It would be surprising if you bought food here…There are much better options all over the place!”

Of course not. But that’s what you want others to do if you don’t believe in yourself…If you don’t think your product is a very desirable one.

So what do people do when they don’t believe in what they are selling? They try and make it look better than it actually is! They do this because they don’t believe in what they are selling — in this case, they don’t believe they are very desirable.

All these bells and whistles are designed to coerce, manipulate or rationalize someone into buying. This isn’t that effective because people are intuitively wired to wonder, “why does he need to tell me how great this product is when I can see it for myself?” A pig with lipstick is still a pig.

You — how you think, feel, look and act — should be sufficient to present to a buyer. Yes, you want to look presentable, which is simply a way of placing what’s for sale on a stage and shining a soft spotlight on it. But ultimately, you don’t have to do any more selling — no coersion, manipulation or rationalization — because what you are selling will sell itself.   

Now you can’t do this overnight. It takes time and effort to make yourself truly desirable to high-quality people. This means that the next time you find yourself for sale, don’t start an ad campaign. Accept your limitations, know your strengths, and understand that there are already some people — maybe a lot of people — who are interested in buying what you are selling.

Remember, your product should sell itself. If you don’t believe in what you are selling, others won’t either.

 

 

 

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One Response to Do you believe in what you’re selling?

  1. Pingback: Taking Control of your Happiness: How Less is More » Taylored Life

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